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LANTITE: LANTITE

LANTITE

Introduction

LANTITE stands for the Literacy and Numeracy Test for Initial Teacher Education (ITE) students, and anyone studying an Australian initial teacher education course is required to successfully complete it in order to graduate.

This page provides some information and resources to help you prepare for both the literacy and numeracy components of LANTITE. In addition, if you would like further information about the test please refer to the School of Education's range of support resources, and to the Australian Council for Educational Research (ACER) website.

Numeracy component

If you are just commencing your preparation for the numeracy component of LANTITE, or if you have already spent time preparing but are still unsure about some of the underlying concepts, we highly recommend you visit our Numeracy Fundamentals module before proceeding any further. This module provides explanations and examples for the concepts covered in the test, and is organised into the three key areas of Number and Algebra, Measurement and Geometry and Statistics and Probability (these pages also include some examples of how to perform certain calculations without a calculator, as required for the second section of the test). As you work through the material you may find it helpful to start putting together a list of key formulas and rules that you still need to memorise, along with examples to assist you in recalling how to apply them.

Once you are familiar with the underlying concepts it is recommended that you attempt some or all of the following practice questions, which have been grouped according to topic. Try to do as many as you can without looking at your formula sheet, but make use of it as you need to - over time, the aim is to do enough examples and sample questions so that it all becomes familiar to you. If you find that there are some sample questions you can't complete even when referring to your formula sheet, you may need to revisit the materials above or to make use of other materials (a quick online search of the relevant concept will usually reveal many helpful pages):


Next, it would be a good idea to attempt the practice questions and retired test questions available on ACER's Practice material page (don't do the numeracy practice test at this stage). Again, try to refer to your formula sheet (or to look up additional concepts) only when strictly necessary. Make a note of any questions that you do need to refer to your formula sheet for, as these are topics that you will still need to work on.

After you have made use of the ACER materials and are starting to feel more confident with your numeracy skills, you should start thinking about some test-taking strategies. Sometimes these can make all the difference in being able to answer a few extra questions in the test! There are some great tips on ACER's Test-taking strategy page, including suggested timings for completing the two sections of the numeracy test, information about the on-screen calculator, and suggestions for how to go about answering questions. You are strongly encouraged to have a read of this before attempting the sample tests that follow (and before the real test).

Once you have familiarised yourself with these test-taking strategies, you are ready to start completing some sample tests! As a starting point you may like to try the test below, which is approximately half the length of the LANTITE numeracy test. There are 26 calculator available questions (some with multiple parts), followed by 6 calculator not available questions, and you should see if you can complete them in one hour (i.e. half the time of the actual test). As in the real LANTITE numeracy test, you should try not to go back to the calculator available section of the quiz once you start on the calculator not available questions. This means you should at least have an attempt at every calculator available question first, as you won't be able to finish the test and review your results until you have entered something for each question (to enlarge any diagrams or graphs click on the little '+' sign). Try not to use your formula sheet at all while you attempt the test:


Next, you should progress to attempting a full-length sample test. There is a good one available as a PDF at ACER's Practice material page, which is accompanied by worked solutions and an equivalence table you can use to check whether you are at the required standard or not. Note that this test is also available as an online interactive test, which you can only complete once you have registered to sit the real test. ACER recommends that you complete this online version rather than the PDF, as your scores can only be compared for equivalence on your first attempt at the test (for further information on interpreting results refer to the ACER document). You may like to make the decision to complete the PDF before you register for the test though, to check whether you are ready to register - but just keep in mind that if you complete it again later your result is likely to naturally be higher as you have seen the questions before.

As an alternative option, provided below is an an additional sample test based on the ACER test, but with different values and some changes to examples. You may like to complete this test first, using the answers at the end of the document to mark your attempt and comparing your results using ACER's equivalence table. You can then determine whether you are ready to register to sit the test, and can use ACER's online test as the final stage in your preparation.


Regardless of how you do it, when completing the sample tests make sure you don't use any notes, that you make use of relevant test-taking strategies, and that you only give yourself two hours to complete it (set aside some time in a quiet place and do it as though it was a real test). With both the tests, if you can complete it on the first attempt with a score that is 'above the standard' according to the equivalence table, it is a good indication that you are ready to attempt the real test!

If you are not able to achieve 'above the standard' on either of these tests on your first attempt, don't despair. Have a look at the questions you missed and see which concepts they relate to, then make sure you revisit all of the relevant explanations and examples provided above. Also, try to find as many additional resources as you can to help you - again, searching online can be bring up a whole range of helpful pages. Just one of many free pages that you may find useful is Maths is Fun, while for practice questions some students find NAPLAN sample questions and selective entrance practice tests helpful (just keep in mind that not all questions are necessarily relevant, or at the right level).

Lastly, after you have completed the LANTITE numeracy test you might feel happy with your performance or just relieved that it is over - but it is also normal to worry that you haven’t done as well as you’d hoped, or to agonise over questions that you may have answered incorrectly. If you find yourself doing this try to remember that there is little point in stressing over the things you cannot change. When you get your results, if you do find that you haven't passed then try to use the information provided to determine where you need to improve for next time.

All the best with your numeracy test!

Literacy component

If you are just commencing your preparation for the literacy component of LANTITE, or if you have already spent time preparing but are still unsure about some aspects, we highly recommend you complete the Structure and Mechanics module before proceeding any further. This module can help you improve reading comprehension and particularly punctuation, syntax and grammar, within the technical writing skills section of the test.

As you work through the material, you may find it helpful to start putting together a list of areas of which you are still unsure, and revise relevant Reading Skills and Writing Skills modules. Also, for general tips on taking multiple choice tests and more tips and samples on tackling reading comprehension and other writing skills, take a look at the LANTITE Literacy Test Preparation video and the Tests and Exams module.

Once you are familiar with these skills, it is recommended that you attempt some or all of the samples in the Literacy Practice Test Resources. The range of questions vary in degree of difficulty as they do in the LANTITE Literacy test. If you find that there are some sample questions you can't complete correctly, you may need to revisit the materials above or make use of other materials. Note the type of questions you find challenging and work out what aspect is causing difficulty: vocabulary, syntax, grammar, punctuation, spelling, word usage in different contexts, or text organisation. See the Content Guide in ACER for further explanation of these literacy test areas.

Next, it would be a good idea to attempt the practice questions and retired test questions available on ACER practice material page. Again, note the questions that you can readily complete and those that you will still need to work on.

After you have made use of the ACER materials and are starting to feel more confident with your literacy skills, you should start focusing more on test-taking strategies. Sometimes these can make all the difference in being able to answer a few extra questions in the test! There are some great tips in the LANTITE Literacy Test Preparation video and more information on ACER's Test-taking strategy page, including suggested timings for completing and suggestions for how to go about answering questions. You are strongly encouraged to have a read of this before attempting the sample tests that follow (and before the real test).

For literacy, the test has one section (65 questions). The available time is 120 minutes, which gives you just under 2 minutes per question. Of course, you might take much less time for some, but do not spend too much time on a question, which could leave you running out of time. If you do start to run out of time, then there’s no harm in guessing answers rather than leaving any unanswered. You are not penalised for wrong answers. However, do keep an eye on the time, so that you give yourself the best chance of answering each question correctly. You can go back to any questions you haven’t answered or may wish to change your answer, so it’s best to move onto the next, if you find yourself thinking for too long on a question.

Once you have familiarised yourself with these test-taking strategies, you are ready to start completing some sample tests! As a starting point, you may like to try answering 10 questions in 20 minutes. Set a timer for yourself, so you get into the practice of answering questions within a time limit. Do this only after you have mastered the techniques suggested in the LANTITE Literacy Test Preparation video and ACER's Test-taking strategy page. Then progress to attempting 20 questions in just under 40 minutes; 30 questions in just under 60 minutes; 40 questions in just under 75 minutes; 50 questions in just under 90 minutes. Finally, after revising the practice tests you have attempted so far, note areas in which you still need to develop your skills, attempt 65 questions in 120 minutes several times. The more you practise, accompanied with revising and reviewing test taking skills and techniques, your literacy will improve and the better your test taking skills will become. Practising without revising and reviewing skills and techniques isn’t very effective. Imagine practising a bad golf swing over and over again. It doesn’t get any better. In fact, you just reinforce bad habits. Therefore, exercise reflective practice by revising and reviewing on the skills and techniques which need improvement before practising more questions.

Next, you should progress to attempting a full-length sample test. There is a good one available as a PDF at ACER's Test-taking strategy page, which is accompanied by explanations of correct answers and an equivalence table you can use to check whether you are at the required standard or not. Note that this test is also available as an online interactive test, which you can only complete once you have registered to sit the real test. ACER recommends that you complete this online version rather than the PDF, as your scores can only be compared for equivalence on your first attempt at the test (for further information on interpreting results refer to the ACER document). You may like to make the decision to complete the PDF before you register for the test though, to check whether you are ready to register - but just keep in mind that if you complete it again later, your result is likely to naturally be higher as you have seen the questions before.

You can then determine whether you are ready to register to sit the test, and can use ACER's online test as the final stage in your preparation.

Regardless of how you do it, when completing the sample tests, make sure you don't use any notes, dictionaries, or online resource; that you do make use of relevant test-taking strategies; and that you give yourself two hours to complete it (set aside some time in a quiet place and do it as though it was a real test). If you can complete it on the first attempt with a score that is 'above the standard' according to the equivalence table, it is a good indication that you are ready to attempt the real test!

If you are not able to achieve 'above the standard' on the test on your first attempt, don't despair. Have a look at the questions you missed and see which literacy areas they relate to, then make sure you revisit all of the relevant resources provided. Also, try to find as many additional resources as you can to help you - again, searching online can bring up a whole range of helpful pages. As well as these, some students find NAPLAN sample questions and selective entrance practice tests helpful (just keep in mind that not all questions are necessarily relevant, or at the right level, but still give you literacy test taking practice).

Lastly, after you have completed the LANTITE literacy test, you might feel happy with your performance or just relieved that it is over - but it is also normal to worry that you haven’t done as well as you’d hoped, or to agonise over questions that you may have answered incorrectly. If you find yourself doing this, try to remember that there is little point in stressing over the things you cannot change. When you get your results, if you do find that you haven't passed, then try to use the information provided to determine where you need to improve for next time.

All the best with your literacy test!